Painter Returns

This afternoon I heard Cullen barking with his “I have a snake or something unusual: treeing bark. It was a painted turtle who had left our pond and was trapped against the dog fence. I brought the turtle inside and offered her (I think) a large night crawler. When Eric and Kathryn got home I showed them the turtle – which I believe is the correct size to be our previous Painted Turtle, Painter. She looked healthy and we decided to return her to the pond.

A close up of Painter.
Painter returning to our pond.

The Back Story about Painter.

Last week Barb and Joe found a Eastern Painted Turtle hatch ling – probably only 2-3 days old.   He was tiny and likely destined as a food source.  They asked Eric to raise the turtle until he was a little older and had a better chance at survival.  Eric named the turtle Painter and after a copy of fretful days he/she has started to eat.  Painter ignored the fruit: blueberries and strawberries but took tiny bites of soaked dog food and a bite of an orange.  Yesterday while Kathryn was working home alone she said she could hear the faintest sound of smacking and looked to see Painter eating a mouthful of dog food.

In the picture above Painter is in ‘basking’ mode.  At night Painter hides under the vegetation. May 16th, 2008

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Painter, the baby painted turtle, was confined to a large tub in the basement where he happily dug into the mud and hibernated until this past week.  The mud in his tub dried up and he awoke to investigate the problem.  After re-hydrating his ‘pond’ and covering him with a damp cloth Painter dug in somewhat and went back to his snooze.  We will continue to monitor his slumber and plan for his move to warmer floors within the house. February 11th, 2009 |

Painter

Our painted turtle, Painter, has quite an appetite and has been visibly growing.  He prefers fish worms to almost all other food and will eat them from a hand if you move slow and dangle the fish worm where he can see it.  A measure of his growth is evident in the wide light gray areas between the scutes on his carapace.

July 1st, 2009

Kathryn’s 2nd Solo Canoe Camping Trip

Kathryn completed her second-ever Solo (+dog) canoe camping trip. Positioning a 100lb dog can make one a little nervous especially if she won’t lay down in the canoe, but other than that she was a perfect companion for 24 hours of wilderness and quiet. Kathryn had a fabulous time and pledges to do this more often. Jim and Eric came up today for lunch and escorted us back.

AFRL RIEB 2006 Staff

Amish Horse Collapse

Thursday night I picked up Eric from playing basketball at the open gym. On our way home we saw a horse and buggy way ahead of us and I commented to Eric that they were going a fast clip. We began to catch up just before our four corners and I noticed my speedometer tracking between 20 – 25 mph. As we caught up the horse and buggy swerved into the left lane and then made a sharp turn back into the right lane. The horse fell. We pulled our car over to the side, turned on the emergency flashers and I asked Eric to watch and signal to any approaching traffic. The horse refused ignored the urges of the young driver and remained down, sweating profusely with rapid breathing. I helped unhook the horse from the buggy and rolled it back out of the way. The horse remained down and a small pool of blood was forming under his mouth; the horse was biting his tongue. The driver said the horse had been running away with him and indicated this wasn’t the 1st time he had done so. A pickup truck approached with man who asked how long the horse had been down and if he had been drugged or gotten into green apples. He tried to calm the breathing of the horse by slightly constricting his nostrils. After about 10 minutes the horse stood up – unsteady and still sweating and panting. The horse was led to a nearby house to get water. Eric and I left.

Synectics Technical Staff

Front: Paul Tremont, Jack LoSecco, Jack Kearney. Back: ?, Bruce Kiracof, Phil, Larry Dembrow

Eric’s Allergy Test

It turns out Eric is allergic to dust mites.

Volley Llamas 2019

This season marked our 21st year of playing volleyball at ADK Lanes, and our 11th or 12th years of having a Wednesday night Volley Llamas team. Our team was largely Kathryn, BillieJo, Josh, Jim, Michael, Rick, and Connor with Shelly, Courtney and Scott filling in as substitutes. We finished 2nd of 10 teams in the regular season. We got a 1st round bye and beat Ice Cold Sixpack (formerly The Young Finndale). We then faced Scrappers who had battled their way to two wins; 25-23 and 25-22. We won game 1 and had a much closer game 2 to move into the championship game vs Dig Pink. Dig Pink lost only one game all season to Volley Llamas in a position round game. We lost 2 competitive games to Dig Pink closing out our season.

Maine

We spent a week on Toddy Pond with Jim, Pam, Vance, Gabe, Maddy, Eric and Stone. We picked up Eric at noon after his Drivers’ Ed class and met BillieJo and Stone at the Canjoharie Thruway exit. Kathryn drove 5 hours to Portsmouth where we spent the night. We had an excellent lobster bisque at Warrens in Kittery for dinner. The next morning we drove the remaining 3.5 hours to Toddy Pond. Eric and Stone immediately began to fish and then go swimming.

Wednesday was overcast and raining so we went to the Chicken Barn, LL Bean Outlet Store, lunch at Jordan’s Snack Bar and picked up 9 lobster for dinner, Eric and Stone cooked the lobster. The Big Chicken Barn is packed with books and periodicals.

Friday Kathryn, Jim, Eric and Stone went deep sea fishing and caught mackerel and pollock. The boat captured over 300 fish which were filleted and handed out. On the return trip they pulled lobster traps yielding 28 lobster. Kathryn, Eric and Stone each won a lobster.

Saturday Kathryn, Jim H., Eric and Stone climbed the Precipice trail in Acadia National Park. Adventurous hikers will hike a 2.3-mile trek with 1,073 feet of total elevation gain – half of that comes in 0.3 miles as one navigates steep switchbacks, metal ladders and iron rungs up the east face of Champlain Mountain. Endangered peregrine falcons nest and raise their young on the mountain in spring and summer, and the park closes the trail from March 15 to Aug. 15 to protect them.

Sunday evening the crew went to dinner at Castine’s where Stone had a BBQ chicken doused in “I-dare-you-sauce”. Then the kids and Jim went home for movie night while the rest of gang paddled double kayaks at night time and observed constellations, shooting stars and bio-luminous algae. Monday we swam and went kayaking and we drove home on Tuesday.

Little Tupper Lake to Lake Lila to Lows Lake

In 2002 Kathryn, Matt, Mark and I did an overnight trip from Little Tupper Lake to Lake Lila shortly after NYS acquisition of the Whitney Estate. At the time we were told that less than 75 people had completed the trip. For this adventure trip we planned to continue past Lake Lila and portage to Lows Lake per the schematic below.

It was a 2 hour drive from Floyd to the Little Tupper Lake boat launch off Sabattis Road in the town of Long Lake. We met Steve at the launch about 9am and unload everything from the truck for Skip and Paul to guard while Steve and I transferred my truck to a parking spot in the Lows Lake parking lot. We returned in Steve’s car to LTL boat launch and were paddling by 11am.  We headed to Rock Pond to find a campsite for the night.

Rock Pond to Lows Lake Traverse

Little Tupper is six miles long and at 2,300 acres, it is the 14th biggest lake in the Adirondack Park. Behind Lows Lake, it is the second biggest motor-free lake. There are 24 designated primitive paddle-in campsites available on a first-come, first-served basis. To the west is a low wetland and the outlet of Charley Pond. We paddled upstream towards Charley Pond as far as the Burn Road Trail bridge. One can continue paddling further upstream for ~mile before reaching private land.

The Rock Pond Outlet is 1.5 miles of fairly wide, gently-winding stream with boggy shores. Rock Pond has a total of six campsites. We stopped at the 1st available for a late lunch at 2:30. We debated the merits of staying on Rock Pond versus trying to knock off the 2 mile portage to Hardigan Pond and staying at the unknown campsite. The Rock Pond campsite won the debate. While snacking we saw people at site 26 – the island campsite. We decided to scout the other campsites and discovered the two people on the island site were day tripping and returning to Little Tupper Lake. We set up camp and the light breezes kept the bugs away.

Looking at Salmon Mtn from Rock Pond

Day 2 we got up at 5:30am and were on the water by 7:30 as we had 4 miles of portages to accomplish to reach Lake Lila. We started off with a 2 mile portage to Hardigan Pond. From Hardigan Pond there was a .55 mile portage to Salmon Lake Outlet. From Little Salmon Lake there was another .5 mile portage into Lilypad Pond. Each of these portages included traipsing over beaver dams or flooded trailways resulting in soaked feet. Finally we concluded an .8 mile portage from Lilypad Pond to Shingle Shanty Brook. We paddled the meandering Shingle Shanty Brook for nearly 45 minutes until reaching Lake Lila. While all these portages showed footprints, the trails were overgrown with ferns and briars. The deer flies were a constant annoyance. While we tried to single carry portions of the portages, largely we leap-frogged our packs and the canoes. White caps were rolling on Lake Lila so we undertook tacking maneuvers to quarter the wind and stay near shore. We reached site 20 which was a large open site with a rocky beach. We went swimming, re-hydrated and cooked dinner. We set up a tarp due to rain projected in the forecast.

We awoke at 6am with the sound of light rain and packed up our damp tents during a lull in the rain. On the water at 7:30am we set off for the Harrington Brook trailhead. The Harrington Brook trail was extremely muddy so we opted to make the short bushwhack to the railroad tracks and skip the Harrington Brook trail and pond. As we trekked up the 1.2 miles up the railroad tracks the rain transitioned from light sprinkles to an absolute downpour as we launched into Clear Pond. The portage from the railroad to Clear Pond was open with good footing – the best trail of all the portages. The deer flies at Clear Pond and Bog Lake were horrendous – causing us to paddle with head nets.

Lows Lake

Paul and I made a navigation error and prolonged our trip on Lows Lake; otherwise extending a 15 mile paddle. As the rain continued we decided to paddle out to the lower dam and head for home, rather than set up a campsite and leave the next morning. We were loaded up by 8:30pm (making a 13 hour day) and drove home to showers and dry clothes.

Hoops Summit, Watertown

This weekend was the culmination of Eric’s 2019 AAU season as his Mohawk Valley Elite team competed in the Hoops Summit held in Watertown, NY. The team came away with 2 wins and 2 losses. I am particularly proud of Eric working to come back from ankle surgery and regain his game. Eric didn’t score much, but played stout defense against larger post players and pulled down double digit rebounds in the last game.